The Soudough&Olives adventure

The sourdough&Olives adventure

A year goes quickly. It’s almost a bit scary how fast it disappears. Yesterday it was one year since I published the first post here at Sourdough&Olives. I was completely new to blogging, WordPress, Pinterest. Everything, even Facebook. I wrote about the comeback of the sourdough bread here in Sweden during the recent years. I still remember how it felt to press the publish button. Excitement mixed with some fear.

Since then I have published 47 posts, most of them are recipes. And you know what? I can still feel some excitement when I press that button. It always feels good. Many hours of work has finally come to an end. The result stares back at me from the computer monitor. Just waiting for me to make it available to almost everybody all over the world.

Just a few of all the photos I have taken during the year.
Continue Reading

Sourdough bread with roasted oatmeal

Sourdough bread with roasted oatmeal

 

Sometimes I don’t want big holes in my bread. Don’t get me wrong. I also love the feeling of cutting up a perfect ciabatta and see the lovely crumb with big holes surrounded by a chewy and crispy crust. Chewy and crispy sounds like a paradox, but that’s how I experience a well baked sourdough Ciabatta. Add tomatoes, mozzarella, basil, and some olive oil, and you have something divine.

But I don’t want that on my breakfast plate on a Monday morning. I am not ready for divine things at 6:00 am. That early I want something a little more down to earth. Something that suits my mood a bit better. I want a hearty sandwich with cheese, red pepper, and a reasonable amount of butter. That can be tricky to accomplish with a Ciabatta, especially when you feel more like a Zombie than a living creature. The crumb of a ciabatta can be compared to a sinkhole. The butter just disappears. Somewhere.

I love butter, but there have to be some limits. So the bread in this post will be a bit less extraordinary. When it comes to the size of the holes, that will say. When it comes to taste, there will be no concessions. It contains both sourdough, whole rye and roasted oatmeal. Especially the roasted oatmeal gives an extra oomph to the taste.
Roasted oatmeal is easy to do. Just keep an eye on the roasting process. Spread the oatmeal on a baking tray and roast them in the oven until they have got a dark brown color. That can happen very quickly, so don’t go away and do something else in the meantime, or you might come back to a smoking inferno. Let the roasted oatmeal cool and mix with a food processor or a stick blender to a somewhat coarse flour.

Continue Reading