Levain bread baked with wheat and a hint of rye

Levain bread

Some days I feel like putting all recipes aside and create something by myself. That applies to both food dishes and bread. Last Saturday was such a day. A voice told me it was time to unleash my creativity. I had to create something unique. Something that have never been done before.

I made my own levain bread.

The result was perhaps not so unique. Many of you reading this will probably think that you have seen this before. But it gave me a confirmation that I understand how a dough should feel and behave for the result to be good, without having to look at a recipe.

Because I have to say that the result was good. I baked some really tasty bread. And that’s what counts, isn’t it?

I started by mixing a levain with a rather firm consistency. It was left to ferment overnight. I used wheat flour and a sourdough starter made with wheat flour and whole rye flour. Any mature starter will do, so use what you have.

Starter
A mature starter is vital.

The next morning it had doubled in size. A good sign, because then you know there is plenty of “power” in the levain.

Levain
Levain

Next, I added wheat flour, water, and some whole rye flour to the levain and mixed everything. You don’t have to overdo it. Just make sure all flour is hydrated.
I didn’t think too much about the amounts of flour or water. Instead, I concentrated on the consistency.
I want the dough to be a bit sticky, but not too loose. Wet your hands if the dough is very sticky. Don’t add more flour. If you think the dough feels dry and stiff, I recommend you to add more water. Adding water is seldom a problem for the final result, while too much flour can make the bread too compact.
After I had mixed everything (except the salt), it was time for the dough to rest for an hour. If you like fancy words, you can call it autolyse.

This resting time is important so don’t skip it. Next time you touch the dough, you can feel that something has happened. It’s not so sticky anymore. Instead, it feels elastic and much easier to handle. It’s because the flour has had time to absorb water.
Now it’s time to add the salt and start folding and stretching. I repeated three times white one-hour resting time after each cycle.

grab and fold

If you have a dough mixer, you can benefit from using it. Then you can skip the autolyse, and run everything until the dough is elastic. Then just let the dough ferment for 2-3 hours.

After all the folding and stretching the dough felt very good. It was holding together well with a slightly “springy” consistency.
I divided the dough in two and formed each part to a loaf

You can use a lined kitchen bowl if you don’t have bannetons for the final rise. Kitchen towels work just fine for the lining. Just make sure to use rice flour instead of wheat flour for the lining. Rice flour absorbs more water and reduces the risk of the loaves sticking to the lining.

I won’t describe the forming process here. I have written a more detailed description in an earlier post. You can read about it here.
It also describes the stretching and folding technique.

I placed the loaves in my basement for the final rise. The temperature is about 57ºF / 14ºC, and it took about 6 hours for the loaves to double in size. That’s my rule of thumb. Let the loaves double in size. If you follow that, it doesn’t matter what temperature you have.

I baked the bread for 40 minutes. Maybe they could have stayed in the oven a little bit longer. I’m quite fond of dark colored bread with a lot of crisp in the crust. Apart from that, the taste was great. A good crumb with a taste that was slightly sour. It was a bread that makes you happy.

One final word before I end this post. Always make notes about everything when experiment like this. Make notes about the amount of flour, water, fermentation times. how the dough behaved, EVERYTHING. Imagine that you’ve baked the perfect bread, but you will never be able to bake it again. Just because you don’t remember how you did it.

That sucks, believe me. I’ve been there.

Print Recipe
Levain bread with wheat and a hint of rye
A levain bread baked on wheat flour and a hint of whole rye. The levain gives the bread a mild, delicate sourdough character.
Levain bread
Servings
loafs
Ingredients
Levain
Levain bread
Servings
loafs
Ingredients
Levain
Levain bread
Levain bread
Instructions
Levain
  1. Mix all the ingredients. Make sure that all the flour is hydrated. Let it ferment at room temperature for 6-8 hours, or until doubled in size.
Levain bread
  1. Mix the levain with all other ingredients, except the salt. Make sure that all the flour is hydrated. Let it rest for an hour.
  2. Add salt and stretch and fold the dough 30 times and let it rest for an hour in a new well-oiled kitchen bowl. Repeat two times. You can find detailed instructions about stretching and folding in the recipe notes.
  3. Divide the dough in two and form each piece into loaves. Let the dough rest for a few minutes before you place it seam-side-up in a floured towel lined kitchen bowl or banneton. You can read more about how to form loaves in the recipe notes. Place them in plastic bags.
  4. Allow the loaves to rise until doubled in size. The time depends on the surrounding temperature.
  5. Preheat your oven to 500ºF / 260ºC with two oven plates. One to bake the bread on and one just below. Place one loaf on the upper plate with the seam side down. Score it and pour some water on the plate below. Turn down the temperature immediately to 430ºF / 220ºC and bake for 40 minutes.
  6. Take out the loaf from the oven and let it cool on a wire rack. Use an oven mitt. Turn up the temperature and repeat the process with the other loaf.
Recipe Notes

I have written a detailed description of both the stretch and folding technique, and also about forming a loaf in my blog post "My best sourdough bread". You can read about it here.

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Chicken breast stuffed with sun dried tomatoes, mozzarella, and spinach

Stuffed chicken breasts

It’s something special with melting Mozzarella. For some reason melting mozzarella looks a little tastier than other melting cheese. I cant’ really explain why. One thing is sure. The Italians knew what they did when they started to put mozzarella on their pizzas.
Sometimes it’s enough to read a recipe that includes melting mozzarella for me to get a silly facial expression. A staring gaze, half-open mouth and dangerously near to start drooling. I feel the famous “I just have to test this recipe” feeling.

That’s what happened when I found this recipe on RecipeTin Eats.
Of course, I changed it a bit. I normally always do. Mostly because I want to customize it to my liking, but also because I have that constant question in my head. What happens if I do like this instead? You have to be curious when cooking. Otherwise, it will be boring.

I didn’t change this recipe that much. I choose to marinate the chicken breasts for a few hours, in my Italian marinade. As an extra touch, I also wrapped a slice of extra smokey barbecue bacon around everything. An alternative might be to use pancetta instead. Then you get a milder and maybe a little more typical Italian flavor.

Ingredients
Ingredients

Sundried tomatoes are superb for flavoring. You can’t replace it with anything else. But everybody has sundried tomatoes in the fridge nowadays, aren’t they?

Spinach may be substituted with a variety of different lettuce varieties suitable for cooking. Think Rucola, Pak soi, Romaine lettuce, etc.
I added some basil as well. I also tucked in a small sprig of Rosemary under bacon slice, mostly as decoration.

Og course you can’t replace the mozzarella with any other type of cheese. You hear that? Don’t even think about it.

The recipe is ridiculously easy. Marinate the chicken breasts for a few hours. Cut a pocket into each chicken breast and fill it with tomato, mozzarella, and spinach/basil leaves. Sear the chicken breasts for a few minutes on each side, and insert them in the oven. After 15-20 minutes, it’s ready.

The cooking time in the oven depends on the size of the chicken breasts. Now, you have to be a bit careful when cooking lean meat like chicken breasts. If you leave them in the oven for too long, they will be dry. Let’s face it. Dry chicken meat is not very exciting.
Raw chicken meat, on the other hand, can be very exciting. If you like to risk your health, that will say.
Always be sure to reach an inner temperature of 162ºF /72ºC in the thickest part of the breast.
But what if you don’t have a thermometer. Then you have to make a traditional test. Poke a skewer into the thickest part of the chicken breast. Remove the skewer and observe the juice coming out. I must be clear with no signs of pink.

There are endless variations of cheese filled chicken breasts. Why? Because it’s easy to make and requires a minimum of side dishes. Some roasted potato wedges and grilled bell pepper is just one suggestion.
You don’t need any sauce for this dish. The oil from the tomatoes, blended with juices from the meat and melted mozzarella is enough. But a small dab of pesto would probably suit just fine.
And don’t listen to what I said earlier. Of course, you can use other types of cheese. I have actually tried one variant with ricotta. But that’s another story in another blog post.

See you soon.

Print Recipe
Chicken breast stuffed with sun dried tomatoes, mozzarella, an spinach
Marinated chicken breasts filled with sun-dried tomatoes, mozzarella, and spinach. A fast and easy recipe with few ingredients but still filled with taste.
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 15-20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Dressing
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 15-20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Dressing
Instructions
  1. Mix all the ingredients for the dressing and marinate the chicken breasts for a few hours.
  2. Preheat oven to 390ºF / 200ºC.
  3. Cut a pocket into the chicken breasts. be careful not to cut all the way through.
  4. Stuff with sun-dried tomatoes. put the mozzarella on top and finish with spinach.
  5. Wrap around with bacon slices and seal with toothpicks.
  6. Sear the chicken in olive oil for a minute on each side to get som nice golden color.
  7. Transfer to oven and cook for 15-20 minutes or until it's cooked through.
Recipe Notes

You can, of course, replace the marinade with your own favorite. As long as it's suitable for chicken nothing can go wrong.

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